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Tag: albania

Seminar Building young people’s resilience against violent radicalisation: insides from workhsops

Seminar Building young people’s resilience against violent radicalisation: insides from workhsops

Mustapha from Belgium: Accompanying the young adults who come in contact with radicalization and the detained Syria fighters    

 

Anna from UK: Introduction to discussing identity with young people

FIELD VISIT AT THE CENTER FOR THE PREVENTION AND COUNTERING OF VIOLENT EXTREMISM (CVE) IN TIRANA

FIELD VISIT AT THE CENTER FOR THE PREVENTION AND COUNTERING OF VIOLENT EXTREMISM (CVE) IN TIRANA

Some years ago, we were thinking there wasn’t a need for such an institution. Social and geopolitical developments in the last years, however, have shown that having a Center for the Prevention and Countering of Violent Extremism in Tirana is indeed relevant and needed for the wider region’.

With these words, the National CVE Coordinator, Mr Agron Bojati, started his presentation about the establishment and agenda of the center in Albania. Radicalization of youth, as Mr Bojati, explained, is owed to a number of factors, which are not necessarily directly connected with ideology. Poverty, unemployment, lack of opportunities and quest of ‘belongingness’ are the major reasons driving young people in the Western Balkans to become radical. These factors, often in combination with a distorted understanding of religion, lead to radical ideologies and consequently, extreme behaviors.

The conversation with Mr Bojati and his colleague, Mrs Klejda Ngjela, focused on the challenges faced on a practical level and also on the role of youth work in creating more resilient societies. The discussions verified the theoretical context discussed on the first day:

Radicalization is a process, which takes time and grows slowly but steadily. Therefore, the prevention of radicalization through youthwork should be a constant, cohesive and sustainable procedure, with a long-term plan.

Personal relations play a vital role. Many people embrace extreme ideologies out of a need to belong to a group, to be accepted and to have a purpose in life. Practitioners working with youth can make a change in their communities by creating ‘teams’ and providing safe spaces where youth can express themselves, socialize and get motivation.

Radicalization and extremism are closely connected with the economy. It is usually poverty opening Pandora’s box and driving young people to search extreme ‘solutions’ in their daily challenges. A ‘smart’ investment on youth and education can have a rewarding effect for the community and the region, as a whole.

       By Mary Drosopulos, PhD ( c )